Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory Bowel Disease



Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are both considered inflammatory bowel diseases. The diseases in this category are caused by intestinal inflammation that is severe, widespread, chronic, and may extend beyond the inner lining (mucosa) of the intestines.



The causes of these diseases are considered a combination of of genetic and environmental factors that interact with the body’s defense system. As the intestinal immune system inadequately functions white blood cells accumulate in the inner lining (mucosa) of the gut. These white cells release chemicals that lead to inflammation of the tissue. This inflammation of the mucosa can cause diarrhea, which is the most common symptom of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.



Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis while both are inflammatory bowel diseases, they have different characteristics in the behavior of between these two diseases. Click on the links above to review each disease.



Inflammatory Bowel Disease



IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) versus IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome)
Inflammatory bowel disease differs from irritable bowel syndrome. IBS does not cause inflammation, ulcers or other damage to the bowel, as IBD does. IBS is more of a functioning problem, which is less serious. The digestive track will work as it should, but will have functioning issues like spasms causing cramping pain, bloating, gas, mucus in the stool, diarrhea and constipation..